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How to Cite
Kristan Halpern, Last modified by Kristan Halpern May 29 2015 02:44 PM

See How to Access Citation Information to learn how to use the Citation page tool.

 

How do I cite this in a bibliography?

The citation information found at the bottom of entries is intended to serve as an aid to writing a works cited list, bibliography, or list of references. How you cite a work in a paper depends on the style you use. Below you will find examples of the most common citation styles.

 

 

Modern Language Association (MLA) Style

The Modern Language Association (MLA) was founded in 1883 as an organization devoted to furthering the study and teaching of language and literature. MLA style is widely used by high schools, colleges, and publishing houses.

 

The following is what our editors have determined to be the MLA works cited format appropriate for this online reference. We suggest that you consult the MLA Handbook for Writers of Research Papers, 7th ed., or talk to your librarian for more information on writing your works cited list.

 

Format:

Author Last Name, Author First Name. "Title of the article." Title of the overall website. Publisher or sponsor of the site. Medium of publication consulted. Date of access. <Source URL>.

 

Example:

Taylor, Allan, and James Robert Parish. "Records Manager." Ferguson's Career Guidance Center. Facts On File, Inc. Web. 19 May 2015. <http://fcg.infobase.com/recordurl.asp?aid=10835&id=65335>.

 

 

The Chicago Manual of Style (CMS)

The Chicago Manual of Style was first published in 1906 by the University of Chicago Press. During its more than 100 years of existence, the manual has evolved into an authoritative voice for authors, editors, proofreaders, indexers, copywriters, designers, and publishers.

 

The following is what our editors have determined to be the Chicago bibliographic citation appropriate for this online reference. We suggest that you consult The Chicago Manual of Style, 15th ed., or talk to your librarian for more information on writing your bibliography.

 

Format:

Author Last Name, Author First Name. "Title of the article." Title of the overall website. Publisher or sponsor of the site. Source URL (accessed Month Day, Year).

 

Example:

Taylor, Allan, and James Robert Parish. "Records Manager." Ferguson's Career Guidance Center. Facts On File, Inc. http://fcg.infobase.com/recordurl.asp?aid=10835&id=65335 (accessed May 19, 2015).

 

 

American Psychological Association (APA) Style

American Psychological Association (APA) style is based on a 1928 meeting of editors of anthropological and psychological journals to determine best practices for the production of journal manuscripts. APA style is largely used by those writing and publishing in the behavioral and social sciences.

 

The following is what our editors have determined to be the APA citation appropriate for an entry from this online reference. When you use the citation in your bibliography, APA requires that you indent the turnover lines. We suggest that you consult the Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association, 6th ed., or talk to your librarian for more information on writing your list of references.

 

Format:

Author Last Name, Author First Initial. Title of the article. In Title of the overall website. Retrieved from URL with record ID

 

Example (If you have turnover lines in your entry, APA requires that you indent the turnover lines.):

Taylor, A. & Parish, J. R. Records manager. In Ferguson's career guidance center. Retrieved from http://fcg.infobase.com/recordurl.asp?aid=10835&id=65335

 

Footnote Citations

Footnote citations vary slightly from bibliographic citations but contain many of the same elements (for example, author's name, publisher information). Consult the MLA Handbook for Writers of Research Papers, The Chicago Manual of Style, or the Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association for details.

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